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For the Media

10/4/2002

Vintage Bath Fixtures From the Flapper Era Make a Popular Comeback

American Standard Reissues Designs from 1922

Classic bathroom fixtures first introduced by American Standard in the flapper era are back by popular demand. The Standard Collection™ includes actual designs first introduced in 1922 that have been re-engineered to meet modern performance standards.

“Creating bathrooms in a period style is a very popular trend in today’s homes, but finding reliable fixtures at flea markets and antique stores can be difficult and time consuming,” said Gary Uhl, design director for American Standard. “By reissuing fixtures from popular eras, American Standard is making it easier for homeowners to accomplish vintage style in their bathrooms.”

Combining the beauty of a past era with today’s 21st century performance features, The Standard Collection offers three vintage-style lavatories, including a white porcelain pedestal sink with a generous oval bowl, a console sink that pairs a porcelain basin with metal legs accented with towel bars, and a self-rimming, drop-in porcelain countertop sink.

To complement the charm of the lavatories, The Standard Collection includes a period-perfect faucet with porcelain-enameled handles, tub and shower fittings with chrome or satin finishes, as well as matching accessories and a vintage-style toilet. Also available is a deck-mounted tub filler with a vintage-inspired, hand-held shower unit.

What was beautiful in 1922 is even better now, thanks to modern engineering. Incorporated into the vintage-style collection are the latest design features, such as Ergonomic Right Height™ design for the lavatories to minimize back strain, and the AquaForce™ Flushing System for the toilet to ensure a cleaner, more reliable flush. Faucets from The Standard Collection feature handles with ceramic disc valving that are guaranteed not to stick, rattle or bind.

Vintage Elegance. The period between the First and Second World Wars saw the emergence of an eclectic design style that would later be coined Art Deco. The hallmarks of the Art Deco period were the combination of geometry and simplicity in interior and industrial design that reflected a celebration of the rise of commerce and technology. Many furnishings incorporated industrial materials such as glass and chrome. Wood-burning stoves made way for gas ranges, electric refrigerators were replacing iceboxes and the “talking machine” or phonograph brought the music of the flapper era into living rooms across America.

The Roaring ‘20s. While electricity and indoor plumbing had been available for years, such amenities became more common in the twenties, especially in urban areas. Bathrooms were most often utilitarian in design with prevailing trends including the use of elegant lines and clean, simple materials. The typical indoor facility, for example, was a functional 5’ by 7’ room with white porcelain-enameled sinks and fixtures.

With the advent of the roaring twenties, bathrooms and bathroom décor became a status symbol among the flapper set. Modern bath fixtures, such as heated towel bars, tiled floor and walls, and bathtubs placed in the middle of the room, were in vogue among wealthy Americans.

“When American Standard first introduced The Standard Collection in 1922, it appealed to a fairly affluent group of homeowners,” said Michelle Hudec, American Standard’s senior brand director for bathrooms. “Those who could afford to own homes with indoor bathrooms wanted beauty as well as function. Design was beginning to emerge as an important element to homeowners.”

Everything Old Is New Again. In 2002 Americans are putting more focus on their homes, where they want to create a feeling of security and comfort. Nostalgic designs offer a sense of familiarity that is driving the trend toward vintage style.

“If the kitchen is the heart of the home, the bathroom is the soul,” said design director Uhl. “The bathroom is the one place in the home where we can completely escape and shut out the world. We want that room to feel familiar and comfortable, and nostalgic designs bring it all back home.”

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